Category: Behind the paper

Studying vascular epiphytes is very hard!

The post provided by Glenda Mendieta-Leiva & Gerhard Zotz

Vascular epiphyte species fully covering tree branches of a cloud mountain rainforest tree at ca. 2200 m. a.s.l. in Southern Ecuador (photo credit: Florian A. Werner).

This post (and video inside) refer to the article EpIG‐DB: A database of vascular epiphyte assemblages in the Neotropics by Mendieta-Leiva et al.…

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How we found which traits predict pairwise interactions in a mountain grassland

The post provided by Hana Skálová, Tomáš Herben, Věra Hadincová, Sylvie Pecháčková and František Krahulec

Recording of the plants in the permanent grid, by Věra Hadincová (foreground) and Viera Mrázová (background). Photo credit: Sylvie Pecháčková.

This post refers to the article Which traits predict pairwise interactions in a mountain grassland?

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Small is beautiful: grassroots projects feed global data synthesis

Provided by Alison Munson

Traits of Plants in Canada (TOPIC) workshop at Mont St-Hilaire, Québec, CANADA. Lead scientists centre front: Isabelle Aubin (right, in orange) and Alison Munson (left of Isabelle). Photo credit: Martin Duval.

This post refers to the perspective article Managing data locally to answer questions globally: the role of collaborative science in ecology by Aubin et al.…

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Delving into “The Corridors of Time”: ancient hedgerows connected to woodlands are living museums of forest biodiversity

The post is provided by Jonathan Lenoir & Guillaume Decocq

Figure 1: A dense network of hedgerows in the so-called “bocage” landscape in the Thiérache region in northern France (Picardie, Hauts-de-France). Photo by Guillaume Decocq.

This post refers to the article “Historical continuity and spatial connectivity ensure hedgerows are effective corridors for forest plants: evidence from the species-time-area relationship” by Jonathan Lenoir et al.…

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Dispersal traits may not tell us what we hope for: the case study from understory of oak-dominated forest

The post provided by David Zelený & Markéta Chudomelová

Recording herbs in the understory of oak-dominated temperate broadleaf forest in Němčičky, Czech Republic. Photo by David Zelený

This post refers to the article Tracing the signs of local dispersal in the temperate forest understorey using spatially structured vegetation data by Markéta Chudomelová and David Zelený, published in the Journal of Vegetation Science (https://doi.org/10.1111/jvs.12835

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